Lack of Slow-Wave Sleep is Linked to High Blood Pressure Risk!

Posted by Mama Yauk Wednesday, August 31, 2011 0 comments


Nassau University Medical Center
2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow, NY 11554
www.nuhealth.net     516-572-5809
 * * * Press Release ***


There are four stages of sleep; light sleep, decreased awareness and two stages of slow-wave sleep.

Light sleep is the drowsy transition between wakefulness and sleep. It is characterized by slowly rolling eye movements and the ability to awaken easily (Nutrition Review).

Decreased awareness sleep is when your sensory awareness is reduced as the brain disengages from the external environment and is marked by slower brain waves, interspersed with rapid waves (Nutrition Review).

Finally, slow-wave sleep, the final stage of non-REM sleep. Slow-wave sleep is described with very low heart and respiratory rates, extremely slow brain waves and a complete lack of eye movement or muscle activity. During this phase, the body is able to direct its resources to regenerate tissues, build bones and muscle, recharge energy and strengthen the immune system (Nutrition Review).
According to a recent article posted by USA Today, poor sleep increases high blood pressure risk for adults.

A study found that men with the lowest level of the deeper stages of sleep (slow-wave sleep) had an 80% higher chance of developing high blood pressure than those with the highest level of slow-wave sleep (USA Today).

Dr. Susan Redline, the Peter C. Farrell Professor of Sleep Medicine at Bringham & Women’s Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, evaluated 784 men, average age 75, who were part of the Outcome of Sleep Disorders in Older Men Study. She found that 243 of them developed high blood pressure within two-four years (USA Today).   

After researchers took into account age, race, body mass index, obesity and length of sleep, the link between low levels of slow-wave sleep and high-blood pressure held.

Dr. Redline told USA Today “Slow-wave sleep decreases with age.” Additionally she found that the men averaged “11.2 percent of slow-wave sleep… Those in the lowest of the four groups averaged only 4 percent or less.”

So, as you grow older, you should focus on getting more “slow-wave-sleep,” to help decrease your risk of having high blood pressure. Allowing yourself to be free of disturbance when lying down will help bring you through the four stages of non-REM sleep, and help keep your chances of high-blood pressure at a minimum.

“Reductions in the deepest stage of sleep is specifically associated with an increased risk of developing high blood pressure,” quotes Dr. Reline. 
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Nassau University Medical Center
2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow, NY 11554
www.nuhealth.net     516-572-5809
 * * * Press Release ***


Hurricane Irene sent many people into a frenzy. Grocery store shelves were wiped out; gas stations ran out of fuel; and batteries could not be found for miles. While some were panicking, the staff at NuHealth remained calm, handling the situation with poise, confidence and care.

According to a press release posted by NuHealth, Arthur A. Gianelli, President/CEO of the NuHealth System announced that the “situation at the Nassau University Medical Center and at the A. Holly Patterson Extended Care Facility is being well managed, with the final phase of NuHealth’s response to Hurricane Irene being implemented in safely returning patients and nursing home residents back to Long Beach Medical Center and the Long Beach Komanoff Nuring Home.”

Gianelli went on to recognize the outstanding care and dedication the employees of NUMC and AHP exemplified during this disaster. “NUMC and AHP played a most important role in Nassau County, particularly because of the number of transfers that we accepted and the increase in emergency room visits as a result of southernmost hospitals not being able to accept patients. At times of crises, NuHealth’s staff rose to the occasion, proving to everyone how indispensible our health system is and demonstrating the quality of the professionals that we emply.”

Earlier today, 56 patients who had been evacuated from the Long Beach Medical Center were transferred back via ambulances and Able Ride bus. The second waves of patients were scheduled to be transported this afternoon, including 28 Komanoff nursing home residents. 
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Nassau University Medical Center
2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow, NY 11554
www.nuhealth.net     516-572-5809
 * * * Press Release ***

Hurricanes are not preventable. Therefore, the only thing we can do is be prepared.

Lessons from previous hurricanes, including Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, have heightened the importance of personal and family preparedness in maximizing your health and safety in the event of such a catastrophe.  

According to the Press Release posted by NuHelath, each year an average of 11 tropical storms develop over the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; 6 intensify and meet criteria to be called hurricanes and 2 strike the US coastline. The meteorologists who monitor storm activity will declare a hurricane watch when there is a possibility of a hurricane within 48 hours.

Are you prepared? Here are some essential suggestions NuHealth offers to keep you and your family equipped for Hurricane Irene.

Create a family emergency plan, including a method of communication, a designated out of town friend or relative whose phone number can serve as a central contact if needed, and a meeting point in the community if your home is inaccessible.

Supply your home with a disaster supply kit in case you are isolated at home, or within your neighborhood for an extended period of time. You should have 1 gallon of bottled water per person per day for 3-7 days. Food supplies should be able to last you approximately 7-10 days. Have a stock of non-perishable packaged or canned foods, snacks, and any special foods needed for infants, children or the elderly. Don’t forget to include a non-electric can opener, paper goods, cups, cooking tools and a propane gas fueled cooking device.  
Keep a battery-operated radio with plenty of fresh batteries close by so you can remain updated on the situation. You should also have on flashlight per person with backup batteries for each device. In addition, have plenty of blankets, pillows, clothes and rain gear on hand as well as cash assuming banks and ATM’s will be unavailable.

Store important documents in a waterproof container to ensure they remain intact. Be sure to include pet food, toys and waste bags nearby if you have a pet.

Most importantly, if you are on any medications, make sure you have at least 10 days of supplies in your home at the announcement of a hurricane watch. Call your pharmacy to confirm they have your medications in stock and ready to be distributed.

It’s better to be safe than sorry. Take this advisory seriously and be prepared for any situation.
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Long Island Rattled by 5.9 Magnitude Earthquake!

Posted by Mama Yauk Tuesday, August 23, 2011 0 comments


Nassau University Medical Center
2201 Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow, NY 11554
www.nuhealth.net     516-572-5809
 * * * Press Release ***


A 5.9 magnitude earthquake shook the entire East Coast today, August 23rd, from as far north as New Hampshire all the way south to North Carolina. The epicenter of the earthquake was near Mineral, Virginia; about 85 miles outside Washington, DC. 

The earthquake sent people rapidly evacuating buildings, wondering “did you feel that too?” According to an article posted by ABC WorldNews, “the pillars of the capital in Washington, DC shook. Alarms sounded in the FBI and Department of Justice buildings, and some flooding was reported on an upper floor of the Pentagon as a result of the quake.”

The last recorded earthquake to rattle the East Coast was in November of 2010. That minor earthquake recorded a magnitude of 3.9 and had been detected from Massapeaqua to East Hampton.  Nothing compared to the 5.9 magnitude quake felt today that made NYC skyscrapers sway!

The NYC Criminal Court in lower Manhattan was evacuated due to the earthquake, as well as New York Times building on 42nd street  which reported feeling “the entire building shift, and [we] watched office furniture move,” (ABC WorldNews).

Where were you when the earthquake hit? Tell us your quake story below in the comment section!
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